View Single Post
Old 02-19-2018, 12:19 PM   #19
Jimway
Ambassador
 
Jimway's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Washington State
Posts: 2,258
Thanks: 1,581
Thanked 2,298 Times in 978 Posts
Rep Power: 145
Jimway has a reputation beyond repute
Jimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond reputeJimway has a reputation beyond repute
Model Owned: 95 Playmate

Default

As adults,we sometimes lose that laser like focus that a kid can have. It's a marvel to observe a youngster doing an activity. Their mind will be only on that activity,110%. We, remember that my expert in flammability childhood friend 'The Flame' was up from the city for a few weeks, tackled the air supply problem with three bicycle air pumps and the remains of a drag saw. Back in the day before chainsaws (Sim knew this was coming), someone, who you would have been easily identified by the absence of a few fingers, attached a rudimentary two cycle engine to a two man saw that had been shortened. The engine drove a big cogwheel that had an arm attached to the outer edge, the saw was attached to this arm. As the engine ran, a feat in itself as they were notoriously hard to start, the wheel turned in a crankshaft kind of way and the blade went back and forth. The whole contraption was only about seven feet long, weighed definitely under a ton, minus the blade. The 1920's epitome of compactness, utility, and portability. It looked a lot like a big wheelbarrow minus the metal or wooden tub. On the handle end were big spikes that you would drive into the log that you were trying to buck. You would fire up the big single cylinder unmufled engine, normally by great effort and the complete supply of your vocabulary of swear words, by reaching in between the razor sharp blade, its drive arm, a drive chain, and a gear reduction set up, to spin the flywheel for start. Hand guards were a thing of the future. Once running, you engaged a clutch handle and set the blade in motion, lowered it onto the log and jumped back four of five yards and started counting your fingers and toes to see if they were still where they were supposed to be. The cylinder of the engine was cast inside of a big hopper that you would pour water into to facilitate cooling of the rig although it seemed to love to 'run hot'. By removing the blade and arm and attaching three bicycle pumps at 120* separation in a circle, we solved the air supply problem. Fortunately for the operator in the depths, I had come across these neat little pilot egress air supply tanks that pilots, who found themselves in an airplane with water both above and below it, could climb out and swim to the surface, at the local Army/Navy surplus store. You stuck this rubber mouthpiece in your mouth and enjoyed a couple of minutes of air. Surprisingly less than a couple of minutes of air could be had if one was excited by external means.
Jimway is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Jimway For This Useful Post:
1954bmw (02-19-2018), ekkick (02-22-2018), Gimme Fuel (02-19-2018), justintocars (03-10-2018), wss (02-24-2018)