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Rough running 350

Again thank you guys, I took pictures of the wiring on my cap and the engine and boat, but having trouble posting them. I know my #1 wire is at 7 o'clock and my #2 is at 5 o'clock. How do you get the #1 cylinder at top dead center and then should I just change the wires and see what happens? Going back to the lake this weekend.
 

PA-Checkmate

Active member
Again thank you guys, I took pictures of the wiring on my cap and the engine and boat, but having trouble posting them. I know my #1 wire is at 7 o'clock and my #2 is at 5 o'clock. How do you get the #1 cylinder at top dead center and then should I just change the wires and see what happens? Going back to the lake this weekend.

could remove the valve cover and watch the valves. turn engine, intake opens then closes and then bring crank mark to tdc(0*).

or remove #1 plug, put finger over hole and turn engine over by hand feeling for compression, then set to TDC.

best to remove VC which is more foolproof. and yes just can move wires from where rotor points.
 

Jimway

Well-known member
You can have the #1 at 7 o'clock right now as long as 843657 follow in that order clockwise until you get to #2. Don't go pulling the distributor just yet unless you have done this type of thing before. Distributor also drives oil pump through a shaft that inserts into the bottom of distributor. Just make sure at this point that rotor points to #1 when timing marks are aligned at crank pulley. If rotor seems to point a little past #1, that's ok. Keep in mind that crank pulley can slip if it has the rubber doughnut in its makeup, so don't completely trust it quite yet. When you get back to the lake take somebody with you that can drive the boat and you reach down while underway and operate the secondaries and see if the engine falls on it's face. If it does, we have some things to check. The engine may bog for a moment while doing this this way but it should eventually start to pull strong fairly quickly. All things considered though, if you were to line up marks right now, put a sharpie mark on distributor body where the number two wire is now and move distributor counter clockwise a couple of teeth so that rotor would point to this #2 mark and move the distributor drive the same amount, and then move wires to the next counterclockwise spot on the cap, you would be set except for setting the dynamic timing again.
 
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I went to the lake today and looked over the wires and found out that wires #6 and #8 are crossed. Can I just take the wires off the spark plugs and switch them since they are right next to each other. And my #1 starts at 7 0"clock.
 

Jimway

Well-known member
Affirmative. That might just make all of the difference in the world. You wouldn't have to move the distributor either, just leave it as is for now. I'm guessing that the engine doesn't idle very well at this point. Swap those wires though and she should smooth right out.
 
I had a very small window to look it over, I didn't get in the water. I am going back wednesday and it goes in the water right away, my fingers will be crossed
 

PA-Checkmate

Active member
switched the 6 and 8 wires on the plugs :bounce: awesome, that was it. Runs great. thank you guys so much, marina could not figure it out but you guys put me on the right tract. I can enjoy the water again.

That's great, but need to question the ability of the marina's service department? Checking firing order is mechanics 101 class(LOL)!
 

Jimway

Well-known member
You know, I speculated similarly with concerns as to the competence of the marina. Their solution to the symptoms presented was a fuel system cleaner (har har). I suspect that I might have a rather interesting and possibly colorful conversation with the marina repair shop owner. I think a rebate on the repair bill is in order. I, myself, can't fathom sending a vessel out the door in such a condition. I treat a boat like an aircraft. You might imagine the possible (and swift) repercussions of placing a similarly equipped aircraft on the flight line. Somebody thinks (visions of grandeur) that they are a marine mechanic. "Just throw some of this snake oil in the tank, It'll be fine".......
 

1954bmw

Active member
Hey Todd, next time something goes heywire, go back to the last thing you switched and switch it back to see if that fixes things.
 
I agree with all of you. Anytime you have a problem here the 1st thing you hear is none ethanol gas is bad and is the problem. I am going to go back to the marina and tell the mechanic that I fixed the problem that he couldn't. And tell him it was wires that needed to be switched. I am also questioning the compression test that was supposed to be done. That is even worse if he did do it and put the plugs back the same way:devil:
 

Jimway

Well-known member
I'm happy that it's fixed and that we were able to offer some help. An inexpensive repair. Reminds me of dealing with an unnamed dealership around here. Guy I know unfortunately takes their work truck to the dealer after it dies on the job site. Couple of days later they inform the owner that the trucks engine is toast but that they are running a special on new engines and that for something to the tune of five grand, they can have the vehicle back up and running. Seeing as the truck didn't cost that much when it was purchased used, the distraught owner happens to call me in the evening on a Wednesday. Truck had died on Monday. I suggest that we meet up at the dealership the following day and discuss options. I'm on site first thing in the morning speaking to the gentleman that was driving the truck when it died. He explains that he got the truck stuck while backing the dump trailer onto the site. The rear tires spun a couple of times as the engine revved up and when he let off of the throttle, it died. It was really hard to start and after he revved it up again, it quit and would not start again. I asked him a bunch of questions concerning oil consumption, did the truck overheat etc, as he was the one that normally drove that particular truck during the course of the day. He even knew that the truck had nearly 200000 miles accumulated on the odometer. Truck was still nice and clean and not dented up at all. So down to the dealer I go, stopping by the shop to pick up the car trailer, just in case. I stroll into the showroom and meet up with the trucks owner who at that moment is receiving the full court press from two salesmen and the receptionist who looks to be dressed for a walk down the sidewalk in the red light district. We exchange introductions all around. I ask to see the truck. The lead salesman and the service writer exchange a brief look at one another. So we walk back to a service bay and there sits the truck with hood open. Under the hood, the intake air hoses have been removed as has the number three spark plug. The spark plug wires have been rearranged on the distributor. I ask the service writer how we have determined that the engine is ruined. I check the oil level and find it clean and full. Likewise on coolant. The service writer has to fetch the technician that has made the determination. This guy gives me a BS story about muffler bearings, six cylinder inline engines, and present planet alignment. I aint buying any of it. "But but but this is a v-8" I tell the guy. He looks down at the engine bay and furrows his brow. "Oh" he says. I reach into the ignition switch and crank the engine over a couple of times while checking for the timing marks. I get it close and reach down and align the marks by hand by hand turning the crank pulley. I pop the distributor cap and immediately notice that the rotor is a couple of teeth off and announce that the timing has slipped, probably has a badly worn timing chain. I also ask the trucks owner, "You smell that?" He leans toward the truck and sniffs the air quizzically. "That's a rat" I say and place my thumb and forefinger to my nose for a moment. The smiles quickly fade from the faces of the service writer, mechanic, and salesman. "If I were you, I'd get this truck out of here as fast as I could" I inform the trucks owner. "Your looking at a timing chain set and probably half a days labor is my guess" I inform all of those present. The three company men, so to speak, take this statement with little enthusiasm and even less good sportsmanship. The company men develop an acute case of poor attitude faster than you could say Slick Beasly School of Salesmanship. When I suggest that I back my truck and trailer in and we load up the truck, the company men begin to recite a tale of company regulations forbidding customers doing anything of the sort. The broken truck is in a bay that is sort of down hill in the basement portion of the stealership so we are probably going to have an extremely hard time pushing it out. Several other mechanic types have now come over and surrounded us. I sense that the time for a good scrap may be nearly upon us. I smile expectantly. While we exchange cruel and mildly risque remarks back and forth, I shoot a glance at the trucks owner. He looks quite pale. I might mention here in passing that I had brought my ground man along with us thinking that we might need some help loading the truck. "Now you've done it" I say and point at the service writer. "You've upset me" I say. "Well what you gonna do about it?" he sneers back at me, probably emboldened by the presence of several of his fellow employees. They look at me expectantly. After a moment, just to provide some dramatic flair, I tell him "nothing". "I just get upset,---- but he gets angry" I say and flick my right thumb over my shoulder in the direction of my truck which I had backed partially in toward the service bay until the company men denied any further progress. All eyes look toward the rear seat of the truck. You can just see the glow of a cigarette from the back seat. "Perhaps I should have him join us now?" I say. I summon him and declare that I have become upset. He opens the door and gets out. He's one of those fellows that even though he is barely 6' 8", he looks fully 8 feet tall and nearly as wide at the shoulders. He looks down at the floor for a moment and then looks up in our direction and shakes his head back and forth slowly and flicks his cigarette on the floor and steps on it to extinguish it as he exhales. The temperature in the service area drops about twenty degrees as he walks up. "What's the problem?" he asks, serious as a heart attack. he has a voice reminiscent of Sam Elliot. I point at service writer guy and then stand back with my hands on my hips. Anyway, to make a long story short, the service guy and friends let us take the truck. So Friday morning we pull the fan and water pump, crank pulley and front cover. You can lift the chain right over the sprockets. We install the new set and reassemble. The truck lights right off and runs like a top. It is right at lunch time when we leave. Just goes to show you. It has been a few years in the past but even with an oil change, new plugs, filters, chain set and gaskets, it was like $60 bucks or so in parts. Owner was really happy.
 
Are you serious, I put the engine top up to check and make sure everything is good. Noticed fuel on top of the tank.:pissed: The only thing I did with the tank was took the fuel intake out to check the screen. Put it back in and it wouldn't go in the same direction. I bought some fuel line and hooked on the new one. I wiped up the fuel and started the boat, I couldn't see any leak, but I'm taking a chance so it is docked.
 
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